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PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND TERRITORIES
#20 - WISCONSIN

Size: 3" x 5"
Copyrighted: 1892
Lithographer: Donaldson Bros.

Wisconsin - Defeat of Black Hawk and Indians; Marquette and Joliet; Stand Rock, Dells

Reverse - Text
Left section: GRIND YOUR COFFEE AT HOME
Right section:
WISCONSIN.
ALL over Wisconsin are the curious earthworks which are ascribed to the mound-builders. In 1634 Frontenac sent Jean Tricolet, a coureur du bois, to make treaties with the northwestern tribes, and to induce them to trade with the French of Lower Canada. In 1658-9 Radisson and Groseilliers, two French fur-traders, descended the Wisconsin River and saw the Mississippi. In 1661 they built a stockade near where Ashland now stands. In 1665 Father Allouez established a mission at La Pointe. The Jesuit mission of St. Francis Xavier arose at Depere two years later. Joliet and Marquette passed through Wisconsin in 1673 on their way to explore the Upper Mississippi. In 1679, among the Islands of Green Bay, La Salle's vessel was lost in a storm. The following years Du Luth and Father Hennepin voyaged throughout the State. In 1692 Le Suéur built a stockade at La Pointe. The country was for a century and a half the happy hunting ground for the easy-going French--licensed traders and coureurs du bois as well--and in the French and Inidan war was a favorite recruiting field for those disciplined bands of redskins who periodically broke forth upon the borders. It was Langlade, a Wisconsin leader of these savage allies, who caught Braddock in his slaughter-pen. The Black-Hawk War (1832) was an important factor in the opening of the region to public view. The Menomonee Indians, part Catholic and part Pagan, occupy a section of the great northern pine-forests and are an honest and peaceful people.
ILLUSTRATIONS.
Defeat of Black Hawk and his Indians, 1832; Marquette and
Joliet crossing the portage from the Fox to the Wisconsin
River; Stand Rock in the "Dells."