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PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND TERRITORIES
#30 - LOUISIANA

Size: 3" x 5"
Copyrighted: 1892
Lithographer: Donaldson Bros.

Louisiana - Arcadians; Bienville; Battle of New Orleans, 1814; La Salle, Mouth of Mississippi

Reverse - Text
Left section: GRIND YOUR COFFEE AT HOME
Right section:
LOUISIANA.
AMONG the first visitors to Louisiana were the Spanish men-at-arms of De Soto's expedition. In 1682 the brave Cavalier de la Salle floated down the Mississippi from the Falls of St. Anthony to the Gulf, and took possession of the country. Four years later La Salle came from France to occupy Louisiana, but his fleet failed to find the Mississippi, and landed on the Texan coast, where he died and where most of his men starved to death. In 1699 another expedition was sent from France to Louisiana under Iberville. It landed at what is now Ocean Springs, Mississippi, and established there a settlement named Biloxi. Iberville and his brother Bienville explored the Mississippi River from Natchez to the Gulf. The first settlement in Louisiana was made by Iberville seventy miles up the Mississippi, in 1700, as a military colony, to prevent the English from ascending the river. Bienville was appointed governor in 1718, and moved the settlement from Biloxi. New Orleans was founded the same year with sixty-eight inhabitants. Napoleon sold the province of Louisiana to the United States in 1803. In January, 1814, General Packenham's British army of 14,450 men laded at New Orleans. The invaders made an assault on General Jackson's lines and were repulsed.
In April, 1862, Farragut and forty-seven American war vessels, after a magnificent naval fight, sunk the Confederate iron-clads and gun-boats in the Mississippi. General Butler soon followed with Union troops, and they thereafter occupied New Orleans.
ILLUSTRATIONS.
Arcadians, 1775; Bienville, Founder of New Orleans, 1718;
Battle of New Orleans, 1814; La Salle at the
Mouth of the Mississippi, 1682.