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PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND TERRITORIES
#31 - VERMONT

Size: 3" x 5"
Copyrighted: 1892
Lithographer: Donaldson Bros.

Vermont - Lake Champlain; Green Mountain Boys; General Stark, Battle of Bennington

Reverse - Text
Left section: GRIND YOUR COFFEE AT HOME
Right section:
VERMONT.
THE first European to see Vermont was Champlain, who in 1609 came south from Canada with a war-party of Hurons on a foray against the Iroquois. The first colony established by the French at Fort St. Anne, in 1665, was opposed by an outpost at Chimney Point, built by the Dutch from Albany. After the conquest of Canada in 1760, the French settlements along Lake Champlain disappeared. After the district suffered separation from Massachusetts, it was claimed by both New Hampshire and New York. A tide of colonists poured in with titles issued by New York, endeavoring to oust the New Hampshire grantees. The latter, under the direction of Ethan Allen and Seth Warner, formed themselves into the "Green Mountain Boys," and fought the intruders stubbornly for many years. In 1775 Ethan Allen and eighty-three Green Mountain boys surprised the British garrison at Fort Ticonderoga, and compelled its surrender. In 1777 General Stark and 1,600 militia vanquished the British army near Bennington. A magnificent monument now marks the spot. In the war of 1812 Burlington was fortified and garrisoned, and 2,500 Vermont volunteers joined in the fight against Sir George Prevost at Plattsburgh. The drain of furnishing inhabitants to the West has kept Vermont nearly stationary in population. In 1889 the State Commission found over 200,000 acres of abandoned fields growing up into woodland. Many French-Canadians have moved into the northern counties and factory towns.
ILLUSTRATIONS.
Champlain Discovering Lake Champlain, 1609; Green Mountain
Boys; General Stark at the Battle of Bennington, 1777.