Arbuckle Coffee Trade Cards Banner
 

PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND TERRITORIES
#41 - IOWA

Size: 3" x 5"
Copyrighted: 1892
Lithographer: Donaldson Bros.

Iowa - First Settlement, Dubuque; Massacre by the Sioux; Trading with the Indians

Reverse - Text
Left section: GRIND YOUR COFFEE AT HOME
Right section:
IOWA.
FATHER MARQUETTE and Joliet visited Iowa in 1673 and passed on. The country belonged to the huge Province of Louisiana, claimed and held by France and ceded to Spain by that nation in 1763. Given back to France nearly forty years later, it was presently ceded by that power to the United States, together with all the Mississippi valley. The inhabitants were mainly wild Indians--the Iowas and Pottawatomies in the west, the Sacs and Foxes in the east, and the Sioux and Winnebagoes in the north.
The first white pioneer of Iowa was Julien Dubuque, a French-Canadian trader, who dwelt from 1788 to 1810 among the Indians at the lead mines, near the city now bearing his name. In 1830 the Sioux annihilated a large party of the Sacs and Foxes (including ten chiefs) on the Mississippi River, near Dubuque, and the people of those tribes fled in panic from their ancient homes. Then began the first wave of immigration, the white miners crossing at various points and occupying the deserted villages and mines. They were ejected by the United States troops under Lieut. Jefferson Davis, by order of Col. Zachary Taylor, who went into garrison until the formal cession of the territory by the Sacs and Foxes. This was made in 1832 to defray the cost of the Black Hawk war. Statehood was for several years withheld, because the Iowans refused to accept the border line proposed by Congress, which cut them off from the Missouri River. Dubuque, the Earliest permanent village, was founded in 1833.
ILLUSTRATIONS.
First Settlement at Dubuque, 1833; Massacre by the Sioux; Du-
buque Trading with the Indians, 1788-1810.