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PICTORIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES AND TERRITORIES
#50 - PENNSYLVANIA

Size: 3" x 5"
Copyrighted: 1892
Lithographer: Donaldson Bros.

Pennsylvania - Braddock's Defeat; Benjamin Franklin; Penn's Treaty with the Indians; Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, Philadelphia

Reverse - Text
Left section: GRIND YOUR COFFEE AT HOME
Right section:
PENNSYLVANIA.
THE claim of the Dutch to the soil of Pennsylvania rested on the discovery of Delaware Bay by Hendrik Hudson in 1600. Seven years later, Cornelis Hendricksen explored the Delaware River as far as the Schuylkill, and ephemeral colonies soon arose along the lower shores. Swedish ships entered the Delaware in 1638, and their people founded the first towns in Pennsylvania. The Puritan immigrants from Connecticut, settling on the Schuylkill in 1641, were ousted and sent home by the Swedes and Dutch.
When the brave Admiral Sir William Penn died, the British Government owed him 16,000. In 1680, his son, William Penn, petitioned King Charles II. to discharge this debt by granting him a tract of land in America, north of Maryland and west of the Delaware River; and so the next year, Penn was made absolute proprietor of the new province. During the forty years after 1683, more than 50,000 Germans and Swiss settled in Pennsylvania.
After the death of the wise Quaker founder, in 1718, the government lay in the hands of his kinsmen, John, Richard and Thomas Penn, and their heirs, until 1776.
Although contiguous to one of the most conservative slave States, Pennsylvania was strongly opposed to human servitude, and its Quaker population took strong ground against the Southern institution. The battle of Gettysburg has made the peaceful little Pennsylvania village of that name immortal. The field where the battle was fought contains a large number of monuments.
ILLUSTRATIONS.
Braddock's Defeat; Benjamin Franklin; Penn's Treaty with the
Indians, 1682; Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, Philadelphia.

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