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VIEWS FROM A TRIP AROUND THE WORLD
#26 - TEHERAN, PERSIA

Size: 3" x 5"
Copyrighted: 1891
Lithographer: Joseph P. Knapp

Teheran, Persia - Persian Soldiers; Country House
Illustrations: Teheran; Persian Gentleman; Persian Soldiers; Woman of Persia; A Country House

Reverse - Text
Left section: GRIND YOUR COFFEE AT HOME
Right section:
TEHERAN, PERSIA.
Teheran, the Capital of Persia, lies about seventy miles south of the Caspian Sea, in a flat and stony plain at the foot of the Elburtz mountains, which rise in Mt. Demavend, 22,000 feet above the sea level. The Palace of the Sahh comprises a city in itself, and since his residence was established there, in 1796, Teheran has materially increased in size. It has a brisk trade in carpets, cotton and linen goods, shoes, hats, etc. The population varies greatly from winter to summer, as the Shah and the wealthier citizens leave the city during the intense heat of summer. There are four principal thoroughfares leading from the city gates to the "Arka" or Citadel. The city is surrounded by an outer ditch and wall thrown out on each side beyond the ancient limit. Between the gates is the gas-lighted Tp Maidan, in the centre of which is a large reservoir. Water is freely supplied to the town by means of underground canals from the near mountain ranges.
In the hot season, the representatives of Western powers move out to the slope of a mountain range north of Teheran--the English residents to Gullak, a village about seven miles from the city. The prominent feature at this point is the finest of the Persian mountains, Demavend.
The population of Teheran is divided among Jews, in very large proportion, Europeans, and Gabrs or Parsis, a remnant of the old Fire Worshippers.
The King's Mosque is worthy of note, also the "Mosque of the King's Mother," the former having a handsome enameled front. Public baths abound, but Europeans use only those of the Armenian, being forbidden access to Mahommedan baths; a matter in which Persians are more rigid then even the Turks. The heat of mid-day during a greater part of the year is so great as to oblige one to travel at night. Rain never falls during the entire season from April to December.
Population, 210,000.